Minnesota AFL-CIO unveils Labor Pavilion programming for 2015 State Fair

Merritt Benton, a member of IATSE Local 13, runs cords along the Labor Pavilion’s stage. Local 13 donated, installed and will run the pavilion's sound and stage.

Merritt Benton, a member of IATSE Local 13, runs cords along the Labor Pavilion’s stage. Local 13 donated, installed and will run the pavilion’s sound and stage.

 

Make sure your visit to the Minnesota State Fair this year includes a stop at the Minnesota AFL-CIO Labor Pavilion, where programming includes live music and entertainment, interactive demonstrations and opportunities to learn about what unions do.

The State Fair runs Aug. 27 through Labor Day, Sept. 7. The Labor Pavilion, located at Dan Patch and Cooper, is open every day from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Members of two performance unions, SAG-AFTRA and Actors’ Equity, will emcee proceedings every day except Labor Day, Minnesota AFL-CIO communications director Chris Shields said. Scheduled performers include roots musicians, swing bands, actors from the Chanhassen Dinner Theater, a magician and a ventriloquist, among others.

“The Labor Pavilion stage is a really good opportunity to showcase union performers,” Shields said, crediting Local 13 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees for donating, installing and running the stage and sound equipment.

[Daily entertainment listings for the Labor Pavilion are available online at the Minnesota AFL-CIO’s blog.]

Statewide and local unions will host kiosks at the Labor Pavilion, offering fairgoers information about their work and their most recent campaigns. Highlights include:

  • Twin Cities Carpenters Local 322 apprentices will build and raffle off a limited number of benches decorated with local sports teams’ logos.
  • Members of St. Paul Firefighters Local 21 will be at the pavilion to sell and sign their 2016 calendars, which benefit veterans’ charities.
  • The Minnesota AFL-CIO will conduct an informal, anonymous survey, asking fairgoers about their jobs, wages and working conditions. “The fair always has a good cross-section of people,” Shields said.
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